Frequently Asked Questions:
Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider Program

What is acceptance testing?

Acceptance testing was included in the 2005 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Standards) to help ensure that the installed equipment in nonresidential buildings was operating as designed and in compliance with the Standards. Acceptance testing generally includes three phases: documentation inspection, construction inspection, and functional testing. While performing the document inspection, the technician is required to review the construction plans that were approved by the local building department. These plans should include the Nonresidential Certificates of Compliance and the Nonresidential Certificates of Installation that are required by the Standards. The technician then compares the approved plans and documentation to the actual installations and verifies that they are consistent. After all necessary modifications are made, the technician can then proceed with the functional test. The functional test is specific to the equipment type and requirements in the Standards. Acceptance testing can be performed by the installing technician or a third party. The acceptance test is intended to give the installing technician a credible document that shows that the installed system was operational and in compliance with the Standards when the technician left construction site.

Is acceptance testing a mandatory requirement?

Yes, acceptance testing is a mandatory requirement in the Building Energy Efficiency Standards for both Lighting Controls and Mechanical Systems. However, currently only Lighting Controls acceptance tests are required to be completed by a certified Acceptance Test Technician. Mechanical acceptance tests may be completed by the field technician until the mechanical threshold requirement has been satisfied.

What is the Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider Program?

The Energy Commission approves Acceptance Test Technician Certification Providers (ATTCPs) that train, certify, and oversee installation technicians performing acceptance tests for nonresidential buildings. This helps to ensure that the acceptance testing is performed correctly and gives the local building inspectors some confidence that the project is in compliance with the Building Energy Efficiency Standards.

What is an Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider?

An Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider (ATTCP) is an entity that is approved by the Energy Commission to provide training, certification, and oversight services for technicians and their employers. There are two types of ATTCPs: Lighting Controls ATTCPs and Mechanical ATTCPs. A list of all approved ATTCPs can be found on the Approved ATTCPs webpage.

What is an Acceptance Test Technician?

An Acceptance Test Technician is an installation technician that is certified by an Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider to perform nonresidential acceptance testing for Lighting Controls (Title 24, Part 6, Section 130.4) or Mechanical Systems (Title 24, Part 6, Section 120.5).

How do I become a certified Acceptance Test Technician?

There are two types of Acceptance Test Technicians (ATTs): Lighting Controls ATTs and Mechanical Systems ATTs. Technicians seeking certification to perform lighting controls acceptance tests need to be trained and certified by an approved Lighting Controls Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider (ATTCP). Technicians seeking certification to perform mechanical acceptance tests need to be trained and certified by an approved Mechanical ATTCP.

While the general requirements for certification from ATTCPs are dictated by the Building Energy Efficiency Standards, each ATTCP has requirements and procedures that are specific to their program. To learn about how to receive certification from a specific ATTCP, visit the ATTCP's website. Technicians may be certified by any of the approved ATTCPs to perform acceptance testing, and may hold certification from more than one ATTCP at a time. However, please be advised that technicians will be subject to the fees and requirements of each ATTCP from which they receive certification.

Who can become a Lighting Controls Acceptance Test Technician?

Technicians who are in industries including, but not limited to:

  • Electrical Contractors
  • Certified General Electricians
  • Professional Engineers
  • Licensed Architects
  • Controls Installation & Startup Contractors
  • Certified Commissioning Professionals
  • HVAC Installers
  • Mechanical Contractors
  • Testing and Balancing (TAB) certified technicians

Participation in the technician certification program is limited to persons who have at least three years of verifiable professional experience and expertise in lighting controls and electrical systems, as determined by the Lighting Controls Acceptance Test Technician Certification Providers (ATTCPs).

For more information on technician pre-qualification requirements, please contact the approved Lighting Controls ATTCPs.

Who can become a Mechanical Acceptance Test Technician?

Technicians who are in industries including, but not limited to:

  • Professional Engineers
  • Licensed Architects
  • HVAC Installers
  • Mechanical Contractors
  • Testing and Balancing (TAB) certified technicians
  • Controls Installation & Startup Contractors
  • Certified Commissioning Professionals

Participation in the technician certification program is limited to persons who have at least three years of verifiable professional experience and expertise in mechanical controls and systems, as determined by the Mechanical Acceptance Test Technician Certification Providers (ATTCPs).

For more information on technician pre-qualification requirements, please contact the approved Mechanical ATTCPs.

What is the Industry Certification Threshold and how does it affect Acceptance Test Technician certification requirements?

The Industry Certification Threshold must be satisfied before Acceptance Test Technician (ATT) and Acceptance Test Employer (ATE) certification requirements take effect. There are separate threshold conditions for lighting control acceptance testing and mechanical acceptance testing. For each threshold, there must be no less than 300 ATTs certified from the combination of all Lighting Controls or Mechanical ATTCPs to perform all lighting controls or mechanical acceptance tests. Additionally, the approved Lighting Controls ATTCPs, in their entirety, must provide reasonable access to certification for technicians representing specific industry employment groups. The approved Mechanical ATTCPs, in their entirety, must provide reasonable access to certification for technicians representing specific industry employment groups. For a list of the specific industry employment groups, see: Who can become a Lighting Controls Acceptance Test Technician? or Who can become a Mechanical Acceptance Test Technician?

As of June 18, 2014, the acceptance testing for Lighting Controls currently requires a certified ATT. The threshold has not yet been met for Mechanical Systems.

Has the Lighting Controls Threshold been met?

The threshold has been met for lighting controls and the Acceptance Test Technician certification requirements became effective on July 1st, 2014.

Has the Mechanical Threshold been met?

No, currently the threshold conditions to require mechanical acceptance tests to be completed by certified Mechanical Acceptance Test Technicians have not been satisfied.

What is an Acceptance Test Employer?

An Acceptance Test Employer (ATE) is certified by an Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider. Each Acceptance Test Technician (ATT) must be employed by an ATE to participate in the program; even ATTs that are self-employed. (An ATT can also be certified as an ATE).

How do I become a certified Acceptance Test Employer?

There are two types of Acceptance Test Employers (ATEs): Lighting Controls ATEs and Mechanical ATEs. If the technician(s) you employ perform lighting controls acceptance tests, then you need to be trained and certified by an approved Lighting Controls Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider (ATTCP). If the technician(s) you employ perform mechanical acceptance tests, then you need to be trained and certified by an approved Mechanical ATTCP.

While the general requirements for certification from any of the ATTCPs are dictated by the Building Energy Efficiency Standards, each ATTCP will have requirements and procedures that are specific to their program. To learn about how to receive certification from a specific ATTCP, visit the website of that ATTCP. Employers may be certified by any of the approved ATTCPs, and employers may hold certification from more than one ATTCP at a time. However, please be advised that employers will be subject to the fees and requirements of each ATTCP from which they receive certification.

How do I hire an Acceptance Test Technician?

You may find Acceptance Test Technicians (ATTs) available in your area by visiting the various Acceptance Test Technician Certification Providers’ websites and looking up their lists of certified ATTs.

How do I verify the certification status of an Acceptance Test Technician?

You may verify the certification status of an Acceptance Test Technician (ATT) by visiting the website of the Acceptance Test Technician Certification Provider (ATTCP) that certified a particular ATT and looking up the ATT’s certification number. If the ATT’s name and certification number are listed on the ATTCP website, then the ATT’s certification information is valid.

What are the differences between the Acceptance Test Technician Certification Providers?

All approved Acceptance Test Technician Certification Providers (ATTCPs) are authorized by the Energy Commission to train, certify, and provide oversight to Acceptance Test Technicians (ATTs) and Acceptance Test Employers (ATEs). Certain ATTCPs provide services to union members only, although certification from those ATTCPs may be available to non-union members as well. For more information about union or non-union options, please visit each ATTCP’s website.

Does the Acceptance Test Technician have to be a third party?

The Acceptance Test Technician may be a third party, but is not required to be a third party.